*** REVISED ***

NINDS TRAINING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR CLINICAL SCIENTISTS

Release Date:  May 23, 2001 (Supercedes NOT-NS-01-008)

NOTICE:  NOT-NS-01-011

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

PURPOSE

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is committed 
to the career development of clinically trained research scientists.  At its 
September 2000 meeting, the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke 
(NANDS) Council approved an initiative to ensure the continued development of 
the clinician scientist research workforce in the neurological sciences.  The 
goals of the initiative are to: (1) Encourage the interest of potential 
clinician scientists early in their education, (2) Accelerate entry to 
independent research, (3) Encourage translational research, and (4) Foster 
research training by especially competent laboratories.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Several programs described in this Policy Notice are new and 
therefore are accompanied by specific program announcements that are being 
simultaneously published in this issue of the NIH Guide.  A separate Policy 
Notice (NS-02-001) describing the new K-awards salary levels and research costs 
was published in the NIH Guide, May 9, 2001 
(http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-NS-02-001.html).  These 
levels, which are reflected below, take effect for awards in FY 2002.

Contributions to Research by Clinician Scientists:

There are several ways in which clinician scientists contribute to the goal of 
reducing the burden of neurological disorders: (1) Recognition of basic science 
advances which could be pertinent to neurological disorders, (2) Using clinical 
observations to frame research design and strategy, (3) Conduct of translational, 
disease-focused research, designed to apply discoveries about basic neurobiology 
to the problems of neurological disorders, (4) Conduct of basic research and/or 
patient-oriented clinical research, (5) Assisting basic scientists in the design 
of studies related to human neurological illness, (6) Educating clinicians in 
the neurobiological basis of neurological disorders.

Training and Career Development Programs for Clinician Scientists:

The following programs provide a series of mechanism for different stages of 
training career development.  These include: A. Programs designed for medical 
student training, B. Research fellowships before, during, and after residency 
training, and C. Post-residency clinician scientist career development awards.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  For detailed program descriptions and access to specific 
program announcements cited below, see the NINDS Training and Career Development 
website:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

A. PROGRAMS DESIGNED FOR MEDICAL STUDENT TRAINING

Medical Student Summer Research Program (T35):

The goal of this short-term institutional training (T35) program is to encourage 
interest in clinical neuroscience and research.  In conjunction with suitable 
mentoring, the program will inform students of clinical neuroscience careers, 
and educate them in patterns of research support.  The program will be 
administered jointly by a neurology department and one or more basic science 
departments, and will require a clinical education component and a research 
career education component.  The program is designed to produce highly 
competitive students to enter the Medical Student Scholars Program as well as 
the MD/PhD Fellowship program.  A program announcement is being published in 
this issue of the NIH Guide.  
See:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-098.html

Medical Student Scholars Program (F31):

The goal of this individual fellowship (F31) program is to encourage interest in 
clinical neuroscience, and to foster early and intensive research training.  
Programs for support of research during medical school will include 1-2 years of 
mentored research, beginning after 2 years of medical school.  Training may 
occur at different sites in order to provide support for students who may be 
attending medical schools with comparatively less strength in basic or clinical 
neuroscience research.  Strong mentoring is critical to the success of this 
program.  The training is designed to provide extensive research experience 
during medical school to especially able candidates who are likely to pursue 
subsequent residency training in neurology or neurological surgery.  The program 
will also support a national annual meeting to foster interactions and interest.  
A program announcement is being published in this issue of the NIH Guide.  
See:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-099.html

NINDS Medical Student Dual -Degree MD/PhD or MD/MPH Fellowships (F30):

The enormous complexity of neurological sciences today prevents the standard 
course of study at most medical schools from providing the experience necessary 
to develop researchers.  Since scientists who are both physicians and trained 
investigators play a vital role in helping to bring the highest scientific 
standards into basic and clinical research settings, this program is designed to 
combine training for the MD (or other clinical) degree with extensive research 
experience of the PhD degree.  Examples of other clinical degrees include, but 
are not limited to D.O. and D.D.S.  The NINDS F30 program is designed to help 
ensure that highly trained physician/scientists will be available in adequate 
numbers and in the appropriate research areas and fields to meet the Nation"s 
needs in neurological disorders research.  The applicant must be enrolled in an 
MD program (or other clinical) at an approved medical/health professional school, 
accepted in a related scientific PhD or MPH program, and supervised by a mentor.  
The sponsoring institution must have staff and facilities available on site to 
provide a suitable environment for performing high-quality research training.  
The PhD or MPH phase of the program may be conducted outside of the sponsoring 
institution, e.g., Federal laboratory including the NIH intramural program.  
Support may be requested for up to 6 years.  The NRSA stipends, tuition, and 
institutional support costs vary from year to year.  A program announcement is 
being published in this issue of the NIH Guide.  
See:  http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-100.html

B. RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER RESIDENCY TRAINING

Individual National Research Service Postdoctoral Awards (F32):

The F32 provides support for postdoctoral research training in the basic and 
clinical neurological sciences.  The training plan should provide an opportunity 
for the trainees to broaden their research background or to extend their 
potential for research in neurological disorders.  Prospective fellows must be 
accepted by a sponsor who will supervise the research and training experience.  
The setting may be academic or non-academic, including the NIH.  The application 
must document that staff and facilities are available to provide a high-quality 
training opportunity.  The application should emphasize opportunities for 
research training and broadening scientific competence.  Applicants must agree 
to undertake a minimum of 2 years of biomedical research.  The NRSA stipends, 
tuition, and institutional support costs vary from year to year.  
See:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

NINDS Career Transition Award (K22):

The goal of this program is to enable outstanding individuals to obtain a 
research training experience in the NINDS Division of Intramural Research (DIRP) 
and to facilitate their successful transition to an extramural environment as 
independent researchers.  The award will provide 2-3 years of support for 
research training in the NINDS DIRP followed by 2-3 years of support for an 
independent research project in an extramural institution.  The combined 
duration cannot exceed 5 years.  It is anticipated that awardees will 
subsequently obtain research project grants such as the R01 to support the 
continuation of their work.  To obtain support for the extramural phase, 
candidates must have a formal tenure-rack (or equivalent) offer in an extramural 
institution.  During the extramural phase, the candidate must spend a minimum of 
75% of full-time professional effort conducting research and research career 
development activities.  Support during the intramural phase will include a 
fellowship stipend, based on the candidate"s years of postdoctoral experience 
and commensurate with the NINDS intramural salary structure.  Up to $75,000 can 
be requested, plus research expenses (see program announcement).  During the 
extramural support phase, the NINDS will provide salary for the award recipient 
of up to $85,000 per year, as well as research costs.  The combined salary and 
research costs requested may not exceed $150,000 (direct costs).  
See:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

C. POST-RESIDENCY CLINICIAN SCIENTIST CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARDS

Mentored Clinical Scientist Development Award (K08):

The K08 is designed to recruit and prepare clinically trained persons for 
research careers in areas of basic or clinical science related to neurological 
disorders.  The program will provide support for a period of mentored research 
for clinically trained individuals with strong potential to develop into 
outstanding basic or clinical research scientists.  The program supports 
applicants who are within 3 years of completing their clinical training, which 
is defined as residency training, and if applicable, an additional year of 
clinical fellowship.  The candidate must identify a mentor with extensive 
research experience and must devote at least 75% of his or her time and effort 
to research and career development activities.  To accommodate neurosurgeons, 
who need significant clinical activity to maintain their surgical skills, NINDS 
will accept 50% time commitment to the award.  This award will provide support 
for up to 5 years.  The K08 award provides up to $85,000 per year of salary 
support, and up to $50,000 for research expenses.  All mentored career 
development award recipients will be expected to attend an annual meeting 
designated by NINDS.  
See:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23):

The K23 supports the career development of investigators who have made a 
commitment to focus their research endeavors on research in neurological 
disorders.  This mechanism provides support for a period of supervised study and 
research for clinically trained professionals who have the potential to develop 
into productive clinical investigators focusing on patient-oriented research.  
The objective is to encourage research-oriented clinicians to develop 
independent research skills and gain experience in advanced methods and 
experimental approaches that will allow them to conduct patient-oriented 
research, and to capitalize on the discoveries of neuroscience research and 
translate them to clinical settings.  Candidates must have completed their 
clinical training, including specialty and, if applicable, subspecialty training 
prior to receiving an award.  Candidates must identify a mentor with extensive 
research experience and must be willing to spend a minimum of 75% of full-time 
professional effort in research career development and clinical research 
activities.  Support under this award may extend to 5 years.  The K23 award 
provides up to $85,000 per year of salary support, and up to $50,000 for 
research expenses. All mentored career development award recipients will be 
invited to attend an annual meeting at the NINDS.  
See:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

Independent Scientist Award (K02):

The K02 supports the development of clinically trained neuroscientists whose 
primary appointment is in a clinical department.  This award provides 
specialized study opportunities for health professionals who are committed to a 
career in neuroscience research and have demonstrated their ability to conduct 
independent research.  The candidate must devote a minimum of 75% of his or her 
time and effort to the proposed research and career development activities.  
Individuals holding positions of senior academic rank, such as associate 
professor or professor or the equivalent in non-academic settings, at the time 
of application are not eligible for a K02 award.  This award will provide 
support for 5 years, however, the salary for the fourth and fifth year is 
awarded only if the applicant competes successfully for a regular research grant 
(R01).  The K02 award provides up to $85,000 per year of salary support, and up 
to $50,000 for research expenses.  
See:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24):

The K24 supports outstanding clinical scientists to allow them protected time to 
devote to research and to act as mentors for beginning clinical investigators.  
Candidates are expected to be generally within 15 years of their specialty 
training, with a demonstrated need for a period of intensive research focus as a 
means of enhancing their clinical research careers.  Candidates must be 
committed to mentoring the next generation of clinical investigators focusing on 
patient-oriented research.  Candidates must be willing to spend up to 50% effort 
(at least 25%) conducting research and mentoring more junior colleagues.  
Applicants must have independent research support at the time of application, 
and recipients of this award are required to hold independent research support 
during the period of this award.  The project period may be up to 5 years (at 
least 3 are required).  Awards are renewable for one additional 5-year period if 
the candidate still meets the stated requirements.  The K24 award provides up to 
$80,600 (for 50% effort, based on the current NIH salary cap of $161,200) per 
year of salary support, and up to $25,000 for research expenses.  
See:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm

INQUIRIES

For detailed program descriptions, application procedures, eligibility, and 
access to specific program announcements cited above, see the NINDS Training and 
Career Development website:  
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/research_training.htm.  Consultation with NINDS 
Program Staff is encouraged especially during the planning phase of the 
application.  For a listing of NINDS Scientific areas and Program Staff contacts, 
see:  http://www.ninds.nih.gov/funding/funding_announcements/funding_opps.htm 

NINDS Training and Career Development Officer
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 2154, MSC 9531
Bethesda, MD  20892
Phone:  (301) 496-4188
FAX:  (301) 594-5929
Email:  NINDSTrainingOffice@ninds.nih.gov


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NIH Funding Opportunities and Notices


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